Published: Wednesday 03 January, 2018

2018 Traslacion Route Released: Black Nazarene Procession to Avoid Lagusnilad

The route of the Black Nazarene procession on January has been released by organizers. Known as the traslacion, the 2018 procession is expected to attract hundreds of thousands of devotees of the Black Nazarene as it winds down the streets of Manila to the Quiapo Church.

Traslacion Black Nazarene

Thousands are expected to join the 2018 traslacion, or the Black Nazarene procession on January 9. (AP photo/Bullit Marquez)

The 2018 traslacion route will have minor changes from last year’s procession route. One of these concerns the Lagusnilad in front of Manila City Hall. Due to security reasons, organizers have decided to bypass Lagusnilad this year.

The traslacion is held annually on the feast day of the Black Nazarene. It commemorates the transfer of the holy image of Jesus Christ from Intramuros to the Quiapo Church.

The image of Jesus Christ kneeling on one knee and carrying a cross depicts His journey to the Crucifixion. It arrived in Manila from Mexico on board a galleon in 1606. Originally, it was enshrined at the altar of San Nicolas de Tolentino (Saint Nicholas of Tolentine) in Intramuros. But in 1787, then Archbishop of Manila, Basilio Sancho de Santas Junta y Rufina, ordered the transfer of the image of the Black Nazarene to the church in Quiapo, which would later be declared a Minor Basilica and conferred the title Basilica Minor of the Nuestro Padre Jesús Nazareno in 1988.

Every January 9,  the Traslación of the Black Nazarene makes its way through the streets of Manila, mainly in the Quiapo area. Thousands of devotees, mostly barefoot and wearing Black Nazarene vestments, either line up the route of the procession or join the traslacion. Many try to help pull the carriage, or andas, of the image. Others, defying serious injury, or even death, try to climb up to the image to wipe its face with their towel or white handkerchief.

Filipinos consider the holy image to be miraculous.

Due to security considerations, the route and schedule of the traslacion have undergone some changes in recent years. Likewise, authorities have disabled mobile phone signal along the route to thwart any terrorism attempt.

Like in years past, hundreds of thousands are expected to join the procession this year, which would take almost 24 hours to winds its way through just a few miles. Last year, the traslacion took 22 hours to reach Quiapo Church.

Traslacion

2018 Traslacion route of the Black Nazarene (GMA Network image)