Published: Thursday 01 March, 2018

‘Racist’ Krispy Kreme in New Zealand Bars Filipina from Entering Store

Krispy Kreme opened its first store in New Zealand to controversy. Krispy Kreme New Zealand has been accused of racism after barring a Filipino woman from entering its store because she is not a citizen!

Krispy Kreme New Zealand

Krispy Kreme in New Zealand accused of racism after turning away a Filipina for not being a citizen. (Emily Ford/

The unnamed Filipina was with her boyfriend, Christopher Smith, when the new Krispy Kreme in Auckland opened its doors. According to Smith, they were very excited about the opening of the famous donut franchise in Auckland and arrived at 2:30 AM to line up for freebies. Their excitement turned to shock, however, when the guard at the door stopped his girlfriend and told them she is not allowed inside because she is not a Kiwi!

According to Krispy Kreme, only locals were entitled to the freebies. Despite pleading that she would not join the promo and just wanted to enter the store, she was still barred and had to wait in the car for several hours as Smith lined up for the store’s opening.

Freebies included a box of donuts for the first 100 customers withe the first three getting a year’s supply.

The Philippine Embassy in New Zealand immediately lashed out at Krispy Kreme upon hearing of the incident. On Facebook, the embassy posted this message: “So sad … I USED to love Krispy Kreme … now they should add one more “K” to their name to reflect their thinking – KKK !!! (As in Klan …).”

The embassy also called for a boycott of Krispy Kreme.

Officials of Krispy Kreme had a flimsy excuse for the incident. They said the company implemented a standard rule that only locals could enter promos and competitions.

“We understand New Zealand has a wonderful and diverse population. In hindsight, it was a lapse in judgement to apply our standard terms and conditions.

“As with any competition, security was briefed to check identification of all customers in the queue to ensure all competition entries were valid and customers were aware of the terms and conditions. We wouldn’t want valued customers queuing for a long period of time, only to be ineligible.”